Take Action

Tell Santa Fe County Commission: No strip mining on La Bajada!

By Teresa Seamster 06.12.14

Fifty acres of La Bajada Mesa -- a landmark recognized by the New Mexico Heritage Preservation Alliance as one of New Mexico's Most Endangered Places -- are now under threat of strip mining.

Reducing La Bajada Mesa to crushed basalt for road base would be a travesty. The applicant, Rockology LLC, would also use thousands of gallons of potable water daily just to reduce dust at the site.

The Santa Fe County Commission heard this issue on June 11 and delayed a decision, though 600 people showed up in opposition to the mines.


Trap Free New Mexico

Trap Free Zia Poster

We need your help to show the faces that support a trap-free New Mexico. Be part of our video montage by downloading and printing the trap-free poster (or make your own) and fill in the blank with words that describe YOU! Then take your picture holding the sign and email it back to Mary Katherine Ray at mkrscrim@kitcarson.net.

Let your voices be heard- and your faces- be seen! In the spirit of the season, gather the kids, the dogs the horses and everyone and create your trap-free NM identity today! The printable poster is attached and can be downloaded.

Watch this video to see that New Mexicans from many walks of life oppose trapping on public lands.

See even more New Mexicans from many walks of life opposing trapping on public lands.


Please ask the governor to oppose harmful and expensive diversion of the Gila River

Golden Eagle and Raven © Mary Katherine Ray

The Gila River is New Mexico’s last free-flowing river, rich in biological diversity and cultural history. But an expensive proposed project threatens it.

In 2004, Congress passed the Arizona Water Settlements Act, which authorized diversion of the Gila River if New Mexico agreed to buy water from Arizona to replace what we take out of the river.

Click here to ask Gov. Martinez not to approve an expensive and harmful Gila River diversion: http://bit.ly/1hT1N1A


You’re making good things happen

CamillaFiebleman.jpg

By Camilla Feibelman, chapter director

In the face of so many and such complex environmental issues, focus and strategic action are essential to achieving real, tangible change.

Without focus and strategy we might be paralyzed by the scale of what we are confronting. But if we organize in a way that lets people take measurable action toward change that we can see and feel, we are more likely to be successful.


We can do it – without an air laser

TrailTrash1.jpg

By Jody Benson, Pajarito Group Newsletter Editor

Here’s a solution for three critical environmental issues: (1) coastal-land loss by a climate-caused rise in sea levels; (2) overconsumption; and (3) excessive population.

The solution? Use an air-based laser to melt the plastic in both of the Great Pacific Garbage Patches (in the eastern and western Pacific convergence zones) to create a consolidated plastic island, then drag one to North America, and one to Japan.


Focus on budget at Capitol

Roundhouse - by Dan Lorimier

By Dan Lorimier, Rio Grande Chapter Lobbyist

Our Legislature meets again on Jan. 21 for a “short” 30-day session. Proposed legislation must either have a direct impact on the state budget or on a short list of issues described by the governor. This session, the governor’s “call list” includes water issues facing New Mexico.

Every legislative session offers bills and memorials that offer the Rio Grande Chapter opportunities to improve or protect our land, air and water as well as legislation that proposes to sell off and threaten our priceless natural heritage.


Hundreds push back on Mayor Berry's "Rio Grande Vision"

Sept18BosquePhoto3.jpg

By Richard Barish, Central New Mexico Group Bosque Issues Chair


Take action: Tell BLM to improve management plan for Otero Mesa and other special places in Southern New Mexico

Otero Mesa

The Bureau of Land Management's draft plan for managing public lands in three Southern New Mexico counties needs serious improvement — and your input can improve it. Special places like Otero Mesa and Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks are at risk if the plan is not improved.

You can help by commenting to the BLM: http://bit.ly/12n1UNt


BLM Resource Management Plan for Sierra, Otero and Doña Ana counties needs work — lots of it

Otero Mesa

By Dan Lorimier, chapter conservation coordinator

Back in 1986 the Bureau of Land Management’s Las Cruces District Office, which oversees roughly 5 million acres of federal lands in Hidalgo, Grant, Luna, Sierra, Doña Ana and Otero counties, finalized the White Sands Resource Management Plan for Sierra and Otero counties and in 1993 published the Mimbres Resource Management Plan covering Doña Ana, Luna, Hidalgo and Grant counties.


What was your call to action?

CamillaFiebleman.jpg

Chapter director’s column by Camilla Feibelman

Most Sierra Club members can tell about a time when they were overcome by awe induced by the natural world. And in the best of cases that awe becomes a dedicated passion for the environment.


Syndicate content