Wildlife

Trapping Reform in New Mexico

Legtrap © M.K. Ray

Most people are astonished to learn that trapping is still a legal activity in New Mexico. Because fur prices are high now due to demand from fashion houses not only in North America and Europe, but also in Asia, the amount of trapping going on in New Mexico is higher than it has been in years.

Watch this video to see that New Mexicans from many walks of life oppose trapping on public lands.


Trap Free New Mexico

Trap Free Zia Poster

We need your help to show the faces that support a trap-free New Mexico. Be part of our video montage by downloading and printing the trap-free poster (or make your own) and fill in the blank with words that describe YOU! Then take your picture holding the sign and email it back to Mary Katherine Ray at mkrscrim@kitcarson.net.

Let your voices be heard- and your faces- be seen! In the spirit of the season, gather the kids, the dogs the horses and everyone and create your trap-free NM identity today! The printable poster is attached and can be downloaded.

Watch this video to see that New Mexicans from many walks of life oppose trapping on public lands.

See even more New Mexicans from many walks of life opposing trapping on public lands.


Crawford Symposium - Feb. 25 - ABQ

BosqueSchoolKids.jpg

2014 Crawford Symposium ~ Green Trails for the Next Generation ~

What: A gathering and celebration to share our research and ideas about the New Mexico bosque and landscape we cherish. This is an event for high school school & college students, professionals and the community to promote information sharing, networking and action to help create a sustainable future!

Date: Tuesday, February 25th 2014

Location: Bosque School ~ Budagher Hall, 4000 Learning Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87120


Westerners pack the room for wolves

FWSWolfHearing-photobyJan Maguire.jpg

By Mary Katherine Ray, Chapter Wildlife Chair

With the government back in business after its October shutdown, all of U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s public hearings on its rule proposals for wolf management have been held. One was in Washington DC before the shutdown, afterwards there was one in Denver, Sacramento, Albuquerque and Pinetop, Ariz. The last two also allowed testimony about the proposed Mexican Wolf rule changes in addition to the delisting all other wolves from Endangered Species protection.


Wolves face ever more obstacles

captive Mexican Wolf - photo by Jeromy Parsell

By Mary Katherine Ray, chapter wildlife chair

As the drought intensifies and the fires are raging on wildland across New Mexico, our beleaguered Mexican wolves continue to struggle.


Sticking up for the Mexican gray wolf

Aurelia Valente.jpg

By Mary Katherine Ray
Chapter Wildlife chair

Aurelia Valente recently wrote her own op-ed for The Santa Fe New Mexican defending protection of Mexican gray wolves after the executive director of New Mexico Cattle Growers said wolves “haven’t proven to be able to live in the wild.” I talked to this 13-year-old Santa Fe wildlife enthusiast about what motivated her to speak out:

Mary Katherine Ray: How did you become interested in New Mexico’s wolves?


Introduced Legislative Memorials would have monitored Game & Fish Dept.

By Mary Katherine Ray
Chapter Wildlife chair

Rep. Jeff Steinborn of Las Cruces, who sits on the House Energy and Natural Resources Committee, heard the testimony on HB579, the bill to ban trapping on public land, and afterward introduced two memorials that would have provided needed oversight of New Mexico Game and Fish Department.


2013 session ends on a good note

Roundhouse - by Dan Lorimier

By Dan Lorimier
Chapter lobbyist

After 60 stressful days of committee hearings, floor sessions, caucuses and meetings, the First Session of the 51st Legislature drew to a close at noon March 16.

Hard lobbying by the Rio Grande Chapter and our ally organizations blocked all of the environmentally threatening legislative proposals put forth in 2013. We also successfully worked to pass several proactive bills and memorials.

The chapter Lobby Team was strengthened with support from Gaye Reese and Elliot Stern, who reinforced Legislative Chair Judith Bunney’s daily efforts. We also got analytical help from Legislative Committee members like Jack Sullivan and Ken Hughes. Chapter activists provided strong support for our priority bills.


Sagebrush Rebellion Redux in New Mexico?

By Walter Szymanski, Rio Grande Chapter member

At the invitation of New Mexico’s Southwestern County Commission Alliance (SWCCA) and the Council of Border Conservation Districts, a fast-talking lawyer and Republican state representative from Utah named Ken Ivory made a presentation to about 60 attendees at a meeting in Deming on Dec. 3, 2012, urging them to follow his state’s lead and push for legislation in New Mexico to “take back” national public lands.


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